Category Archives: Photo Vignettes

Glacial Abstraction

Not to harp on about snow and ice – being in the midst of a New York winter doesn’t help. Snowy days are followed by slushy watery mixes of snow and rain. Snowy banks form along the road covered by brown sludge and dirt. But it all started out as beautiful fresh snow. Fluffy, white, pure, clean. There is indeed something special about a fresh snowfall and a city covered in muffled silence and peaceful powder. And then snow, compacted and frozen becomes something entirely different – glacial material. Despite snow being white, ice and glaciers are a deep blue color, evidence (if grossly simplified) of the compression of air bubbles in the snow until the ice becomes an ethereal blue, crystal aquamarine colour – stunning and mesmerizing.

The science is actually pretty fascinating…but even if one just focuses on the aesthetic, glaciers are gorgeous. And nowhere have I seen as gorgeous glacial material as in Patagonia. Moving, active glaciers – alive as they slide down mountains. Full of abstract shapes and sharp crystals. The ice can sometimes look like pockmarked, dirty surfaces, other times like castles of sharp crystals and castles. The ice can look smooth and shapely. Or other times contaminated and granular. The glacial blue material is definitely a great source of abstract artistic beauty. I have interspersed some of my great memories of Patagonia glaciers with shots that show the grand scale of these glaciers – if only you can get the perspective.

Indeed, nothing like snow and ice.

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Views of Perito Moreno Glacier from afar near El Calafate, Argentina.

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A city of ice…Perito Moreno is the size of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Craters and crystals.

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Coarse ice, brittle ice shelves. Textured castle walls.

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Crystal kingdoms #1

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Crystal kingdoms #2

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Blue Rhapsody at the Viedma Glacier, El Chalten.

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Lone explorer ahead on the Viedma Glacier, amidst the blue stillness.

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Blue flotation vehicle. A broken piece of glacial ice.

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The welcome to the Viedma Glacier, El Chalten, Argentina. Intense and rich colours and broken rock-like surfaces.

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Ice formations like brittle ice blocks with crystal growths.

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A moonscape full of craters of ice, abstract design.

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Crevasse #1

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Crevasse #2

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Overlooking the crevasse…group shot. El Chalten, Argentina.

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Pockmarks and textures #1

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Pockmarks and textures #2

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Glacial tunnels beneath the tower of ice, Viedma Glacier, El Chalten.

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The view of Cierro Fitzroy after an 8 hour trek. The view was so spectacular we were left speechless. Surrounded by intense blues and greens, the layer of ice on the lake sat like an ice sheet – white and pure.

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Ice floating beneath the clouds, above the lake. Cierro Fitzroy, El Chalten.

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Icy reflections in the shadows, Cierro Fitzroy, El Chalten.

M xx

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Snowmance

The storm that never was. As you may have heard: Winter Snowstorm Juno was a non-event (or non-snowstorm). Of course, the only time we got an official “snow day” to stay home from work, where the subway was closed for an historic overnight period, I happened to be out of town! Whereas most people get rather upset or concerned, me coming from a warm and temperate climate city like Sydney, I happen to find snowstorms extremely exciting!  Aptly, Snowstorm Juno was supposed to hit on Australia Day – January 26th, 2015! However – it didn’t quite eventuate – and so instead people just got overly critical of the public authorities and their (rational) excessive preparations! Seriously though, it’s crazy how living in New York in the winter makes you intensely aware of the impact that extreme weather has on your ability to go about your daily business.

This reminded me of last year’s Snowstorm Pax which took me and much of New York by surprise in early Feb 2014. It was my first experience of an extreme snowstorm – it was tough to get out of your house, let alone commute to work! In my excitement at being unable to get to work, I enthusiastically took to the streets with my camera at 7am and begun taking photos of the beautiful streets…now enshrouded in white. Purified and cleansed by the powdery clean snow.  The grey building and streets illuminated. People running through the silent streets became blurred figures of color standing out against the ice-queen whiteness.

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West 10th St and Waverly Place – the intersection with one of my favorite bookstores in the city (Three Lives) covered in a layer of powdery whiteness.

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More snow covered Christmas and pine trees than you’ll ever need!

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A heavy snowfall…enough to envelope your car!

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A gift from from the Snow Gods

It would have been fine if I hadn’t been supposed to take a flight to Australia for a wedding!! Yes – on the biggest snowstorm of the year last year, I literally ended up crying on phone to the Qantas flight representative (not something I would ever usually do…but in desperation I didn’t quite know what else to do!)…and so I was kindly passed onto a helpful customer service rep for the first time ever! The story has a happy ending – I somehow managed to escape the city via a completely rerouted flight and made the wedding (in case you were worried)! But more importantly…I also managed to take some fun photos of the snow storm; amidst a city quietened in a romantic snowfall. Enjoy these pictures of the West Village in the misty whiteness: a snowmance.

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The entry to my old apartment building romantically covered in sideways snow 

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The cast-iron gates outside my old apartment, wrapped up 

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Running for cover: pink and red masked in white. White marked by red and pink.

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Not going anywhere anytime soon – wheels buried in the snow on Waverly Place, New York City

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Quickly escape into the red brick house!

M xxx

Portrait of a Peruvian Lady

The face is an insight into each unique life lived. The wrinkles, the expressions and above all the eyes. A window into the soul. So says the cliché. I suspect it contains a very large dose of truth.

I was reminded recently of one of my favourite sets of old portrait photos: a series of beautiful, strong Peruvian women I encountered on my travels in 2009. These photos, taken on a small point and shoot Canon camera I’d gotten for Christmas of the year before, were nothing sophisticated – but they were honest and reflected a desire to connect with a new culture I was experiencing and loving. Tucked away in my photo folders on an old external hard drive – they have traipsed around the world with me and are a nostalgic reminder of uni travels.

And so, on a cold winter’s night after perusing textures and colours at an exhibition of Latin American contemporary art at the Museum of Art & Design or “MAD” in NYC, I came home in search of my old archives! They brought back memories of how mesmerized I was by the Latin American continent when I first arrived in Peru for the first time. The colours, the smells, the chaos, the people, the food. The faces. Travelling through the countryside – the Colca Canyon region and Arequipa beyond the touristy Cuzco and hectic Lima – the clothing in particular was infused with a dash of texture, shape, pattern and colour that was representative of the strong and diverse personalities of the women that I came into contact with.

Crafts, textiles and weaving are a big part of the Peruvian culture of artisanship, skills held primarily among the women. Wandering along the streets of small towns, I was reminded of the need to provide for family and children. Many of these women keep up traditions not for just pure passion but for necessity and income – tourism and selling traditional arts remain an important source of growth for Peru. Much like in any other country, some encounters were friendly – others were distracted as the women were engrossed in their creations, or suspicious of tourists. Invariably – a little bit of Spanish helped.

These photos are a short storyboard of my travels through Peru – interacting with women on the street, in museums, on tourist tracks between canyons and trails. They speak to my own love of the textures, colours and patterns of the Peruvian culture and the interesting Peruvian women I met along the way…

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Mother and daughter – colourful hats, sharp eyes, overlooking the Colca Canyon

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Suspicious knitter

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Don’t distract me…I’m knitting

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Maria, the friendliest by far on the streets of Arequipa

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Hard work

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Shy weaver

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Hiding behind my llama

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Artisan sewing in modern colours

M xx

#toystory

I grew up loving a stuffed toy elephant and lion. Together,  they were Ellie and Leo. Very original, I know.  They were a set of stuffed small bean-bag style toys. The best of friends among themselves, propped up on my bed. They were adorable (if I don’t say so myself). They travelled the world with me and like for any child, they were a comforting, constant presence.

Leo’s mane had been whittled into a thin wisened, wizardly beard, almost dreadlock-like from overuse: too much stroking, not enough washing hehe. Don’t laugh. I had them well into my late teens (…if not into my early 20s!). I’m sure many people share this trait, they just don’t admit to it. As I grow older, I actually get more comfortable with admitting the desire to hold onto being a child at heart. These toys were a window into my childhood.

I was genuinely excited to go to Africa earlier this year, to discover Ellie and Leo’s ancestors. No joke. Lions and elephants were both  spectacular in the flesh!! I think Leo had always been my secret favorite (even though I know we’re not supposed to have favorites)…but the surprise of the trip was most definitely having fallen in love with elephants.  Elephants exhibit a depth of emotional intelligence and humanity to them that was almost palpable.  Lions do still have some the most interesting behavior of all the cats, and of many of the animals in general.  You can watch them for hours: they have interesting social behaviors and are often more active than many other animals.  It can also take FOREVER to find them!  We were lucky enough to find a few lionesses on the hunt in Kruger National Park and it was one of the most incredible experiences to watch them running between and around the cars on safari, using the road to track their kill and the cars like boulders, oblivious to us bystander!!

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Sniffing something out

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Too close for comfort?

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Leo’s mother on the move

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I can’t help myself – an occasional black and white monotone photo I think often adds great character and intensity to already beautiful animal portraits. The harsh sunlight and shadows from the trees in the South African landscape made for some beautiful, playful darkened lines and patches on these lionesses, deep in concentration.

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Deep in contemplation (…maybe the next meal?)

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Stealth beneath the bushes

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The intensity of a lioness

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A young male hiding beneath the thicket

Elephants tend to be a little easier to catch – size sometimes matters.

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Ellie’s grandfather caught hiding behind the trees

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Cousins in the reeds

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I’m watching you!

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Don’t be shy!

Ellie and Leo were eventually joined by another long-eared and flopsy mopsy rabbit (read Beatrix Potter if you don’t know this reference!), with a triangle-like body, that I named Isosceles: a great descriptive name!  I left Ellie, Leo and Isosceles in Australia…New York winters were a little too harsh for them! More recently though, in the concrete jungle, the metropolis of New York – I was gifted a somewhat ironic addition. A small donkey! Ruben, or ‘Rubi’ for short. Watch this space 🙂 #anothertoystory

A warm and fuzzy story always helps start the week on the right note. Happy Sunday.  Good luck for Monday!

M xx

Knockout

I have a very animated way of talking which involves waving my hands around a lot. Not a big surprise if you take into account my Italian background. Then add in a pinch of enthusiasm, a hint of energy and a  drop of flamboyant personality…and you have a recipe for knocking over many glasses of water! Yes, I have spilled a lot of water in kitchens and at restaurant tables in my adult years, not to mention my childhood ones.  Recently, I managed to knock over a series of full glasses of water in fancy New York establishments onto the lap of my great friend MC. In both cases I had barely touched my glass of wine, so I really had no excuse other than my own over enthusiasm and excessive gesticulations to blame! Thank you MC for being so patient with my water spills!

Water glasses are not the only casualty from this intensity in communication style – I have (accidentally) knocked people in the face with my elbows on the dance floor (to the chagrin of their boyfriends nearby!) and practically and unintentionally tripped myself over, rifled phones to the floor and ruffled many feathers.

The unintentional “knockout” moment. It is amazing what you discover when it happens. Some people laugh as you collect yourself and clear the spillage. Some people respond as if distressed by the invasion of their peace and personal space. Some people start up a conversation in the wake of the damage, as if you broke the ice and opened yourself up to a fresh, genuine interaction. It is impossible to be inauthentic in that (embarrassing) moment! Caught off guard by your own imperfection and unconstrained passion for the topic of the day.

That “knockout” moment is not always bad. In fact – in the creative process, it most often manifests itself as a moment of inspiration, of  eye-opening wonder. When you suddenly seize the moment, filled with a sense of vision. It happens in writing, it happens in art, it happens when you get that perfect shot, without trying. It doesn’t happen often, but when it does – it’s great. I find travel often wields these artistic “knockout” moments, more than normal life. Maybe it’s because our hearts are more open to them. We are more relaxed, more liberated. Maybe it’s because what we see is somehow new and makes us feel renewed, novel and different. Bill Bryson put it beautifully:

To my mind, the greatest reward and luxury of travel is to be able to experience everyday things as if for the first time, to be in a position in which almost nothing is so familiar it is taken for granted.

– Bill Bryson

I share a couple of “knockout” visions. They are by no means the best photos ever taken at all, but I can remember feeling a sense of satisfaction when I took them. A random selection to inspire over the weekend.

1. Composition

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The art of gelato: it was too good to pass up, the moment of dripping, melting gelato in the Springtime sun on a backstreet in Milan with my sister’s bright multi-colored necklace shining in the background!

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Seal Rocks: the most gorgeous outlook to the Pacific Ocean on the north coast of NSW, Australia. The turquoise waters shimmering in the summer sun and the green shrubs in the foreground, both a lovely contrast to the deep, dark blue hues of the watery expanse.

2. Intense color and contrast

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German tulips: brightening your day and the tiny dew drops topped off one of my favorite flower photos.

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African sunset: it doesn’t get any better than an African sunset along the Chobe River in Botswana. It took your breath way.

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Micro China: red, the color of fortune and royalty. These slippers from a market stall in China were a bright reminder of a regal past. I love the messiness of the close up, entangled tassels and all.

3. Ambience / enigmatic human interest

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Rainy reflections: stuck on a rainy night in the backstreets of the charming, quaint town of Suzhou, China about an hour or so outside Shanghai, the reflections of the bright lanterns with these lone girls huddled under their shared umbrella just captivated me. The blur of the photo felt in tune with the drizzly outlook from underneath my own umbrella.

Old fashioned Shanghai street: This is by no means the most fabulous set of photos, but it felt like I’d capture a moment of humanity passing by me in those moments. I was standing still and alone on a standard back street somewhere in the metropolis of Shanghai, with people, cars and mess passing by me. In those moment, two elderly gentlemen cycled slowly past, and 2 elderly ladies wandered in the opposite direction. Each a slow solitary figure in this overcrowded city. Each simply going about their own daily business and happening to have intersected with my own travels, in a moment when I too had stopped to take stock.

4. Nature: stunning scenery

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Antarctic ice sheet reflections

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Iceberg depths

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Spot the penguin

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Iceberg graveyard

5. Great smiles

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Colca Canyon Joy: traveling through the Colca Canyon in Peru, we would stop along the road to look at the beautiful local scarves and textiles, occasionally buying something or chatting with the locals. This mother and daughter captivated me – in their traditional colorful patterned dresses and hats of the local area. The warmth of the mother’s expression, the hand of the daughter leaning close to her mother. A great smile lights up a portrait like nothing else. We all look better smiling! 

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Maria de Arequipa: I managed to garner from my basic Spanish that this lady’s name was Maria as she sat smiling on the sidewalk of the old town of Arequipa, Peru making small dolls and keychain dolls – artisanship slowly being lost. Her positivity was palpable.

Have a great weekend!

M xx

Jeepers Creepers, where’d ya get those eyes?

I always find myself invariably distracted by random human interest articles,  attracted to artistic reviews rather than practical current affairs in my online news wanderings.  My latest distraction was an article in the NY Times about a photographer who took photos of 4 sisters over 40 years – every year since 1975!  Gorgeous, simple, raw photos – all in black and white.  Capturing sisterly connection, youth, changing fashions and hairstyles, aging.  They were really beautiful, an insight into an interesting story.

It reminded me of how portraits, both paintings and photography, are a special and incisive way of capturing relationships, emotions, human essence. It reminded me of some of the photos I took in wilderness of Botswana of the San Bushmen, a small fading group of nomadic peoples whose fate, as they are driven off the land and can no longer hunt, is reminiscent of many indigenous peoples globally. Reviewing the photography portraits of the hour or so I spent in their presence, learning about their culture, their clicking language, their expert knowledge of the wilderness and the wealth it offers us, their relationships,  I reflected upon the  intensity in their eyes. And ironically, in the comfort of my New York apartment, the old Louis Armstrong song came to mind…

When the weather vane points to gloomy
It’s gotta be sunny to me, when your eyes look into mine…

…says mother looking into her child’s eyes.

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Mother smiles and plays with her child, warms him, cleans his snotty nose. Maternal love does not change across cultures!

Intensity in the expressions shared between them; many inside jokes we didn’t understand as they laughed at us no doubt! There was happiness with their children, generosity and humor among themselves. There was also a sense of uncertainty about the future. A certain sadness.

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Young Proud San Man

The only young man in their presence, although small and fine in stature, was a proud and strong man. He is the heir apparent to lead the community here in the San community in southwestern Botswana. Apparently he was also the brother of the Botswana Ambassador in London…what a different life choice. His elder was a wispy, thin man full of sinew and filled with a sense of responsibility as he scoured the ground and earth for its riches. The most excited we saw him was when he showed us how they make fire – which literally burst into flame and lit up his whole expression.

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Elder

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 Feeding from the egg

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Twilight

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Sleepy child

Jeepers Creepers, where’d ya get those peepers?
Jeepers Creepers, where’d ya get those eyes?
Gosh all git up, how’d they get so lit up?
Gosh all git up, how’d they get that size?
Louis Armstrong – Jeepers Creepers Lyrics | MetroLyrics

There was a part of me that felt a deep sadness in the eyes of the San Bushmen in the orange, dusk lighting of the African plains – despite flashes of laughter, of fascination, of love. A loss of engagement, a loss of their community space. Sharing their portraits is partly my way to share in the awareness of the diversity in this world. To open up our horizons to different lives. To share in humanity, through the eyes and portraits of others.

M xx

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Falling in love with elephants

I don’t think I’ve ever been so scared in my life as when I saw an elephant walking towards me.  On safari. In Kruger National Park. Amazing place! And of course, the safari guide, rather than driving backward and reversing away from the advancing bull – he drove forward and stopped the safari truck near a tree, waiting patiently for the bull to near our truck. It stopped right at the tree. Nibbled on some green shoots. Surveyed the area. Sized us up. I wandered what it was wandering about. Terrified. So terrified I even stopped taking photos, scared that the elephant’s trunk would reach into the car or hear and take offense from my camera shutter. Little did I know that animals see black and white, and in 2D – so they couldn’t see me inside the vehicle anyway! My friend took some very funny photos of my wide eyes and shocked expression as the elephant walked past us peacefully and left us well alone! What an experience.

Kruger National Park is probably one of the most incredible nature and animal sanctuaries. A reminder of what Eden must have been like. Of what the world was like before we relegated these enormous, mighty animals to small national parks. It was a meditative space of beauty. And Africa Spear was a fantastic safari company – fwiw. Our safari guide was truly passionate about the park, conservation, the animals – his knowledge was impressive. He particularly loved elephants. He would talk to them. He would talk to them. He would invite them over.

And the elephants understood. I really believe that. You could feel their intelligence. Their piercing eyes – looking deep into you. They are  majestic, grand animals. They are capable of love, gratitude, happiness, pain, expressing fun, thanks and anger. You could see them helping the children of the herd across the river, you could see them having fun with each other, spraying water and sand on themselves and others. The biggest mammals on the lands of this earth – wonderfully meditative and insightful. Old wisened men and mothers in a hulk, wrinkled body. I can see why Hindus see Ganesh as a great deity.

I came to Africa thinking I would be most fascinated by the big cats, intoxicated by my dream of seeing lions and leopards. And instead I fell in love with elephants.

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Twin delight

Most of these photos were actually taken in Botswana, in Chobe National Park. It is the home to some of the highest density of the Kalahari elephant, the largest in the world. Some 120,000 or so are in the park. And they are an impressive bunch.

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Mother and daughter

The elephants helped each other cross the rivers and would arise from the waters dark and glistening, as if their grey bone colored wrinkled bodies had turned a dark chocolate brown.

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Mamma, don’t leave me behind!

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Doesn’t he look like he’s smiling!?

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Keeping cool in the hot summer’s day

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 I see you elephant, behind that tall grass!

A must-read on your trip to Africa (or Asia) if you are going to see elephants, is the book “Elephant Company”. I think I had already fallen in love with elephants before I came into contact with them, such was the personality and humanity expressed of the gentle giants.

M xx

Lost Phones. Lost Worlds.

Sometimes I wonder if I was meant to live in another era. An era before smartphones. Or iPhones. Whatever you want to call them! I have had a tendency in the last 18 months to destroy, lose, have stolen, or simply mistreat my phones (one instance involved spilling coconut water all over my phone…yes, I drink coconut water…and I’ll have you know the phone recovered!). I have gone through 4 phones and 2 blackberries since I moved overseas (one snatched out of my hand by a road bike burglar of all things!). My mobile destruction capabilities have become infamous among my family and friends! I am even used as an example of why insurance is so expensive. In fact, I used up my phone insurance – only 2 new phones were covered. I was very unimpressed when I found out! And I swear that I wasn’t this incompetent at maintaining my communication devices in the past! Not sure exactly what happened after I moved to New York. I believe it’s because I have small hands, and the Samsung Galaxy S3 is really quite big (a little bit like the iPhone 6), so my propensity for dropping phones must be higher than the average person. I also think it has something to do with the fact that the phone is my most important accessory (and now most expensive one…my a long shot) because I love being in touch with family and friends all the time, I love correspondence of all sorts, I am an active (or hyperactive) messager, and basically I believe that if everyone carried the phone around as much as I do, they too would need a new phone every 3 months too! I am waiting for when Apple invents a phone that slips onto your hand like a glove, or an implanted chip. Then maybe my phone karma would improve!

Despite my addiction to my phone(s), there is nothing quite like a holiday that allows you to disappear from your normal, daily grind. That allows you to escape. To stop time. To live in the moment. There is nothing quite like a great adventure holiday. And there is nothing quite like escaping the unrelenting pressure of work in a big city where everyone gets so uptight and caught up…on everything. In response to this pressure cooker, I sometimes seek solace in the wilderness without wifi. That’s right, I have spent the last few years becoming a passionate wilderness traveller and have fallen in love with remoteness. Looking for places that remind you of lost worlds that are waiting to be discovered. And while I might mistreat my cameras, drop them, get water, rain and snow on them, take them kayaking in Antarctica (not recommended) or trek with them…at least they are usually too big to lose and usually come with a strap that you can stick around your neck or across your shoulders so they are attached to you. They are more reliable than phones when it comes to photography ;).

And so I share below some of my favorite wilderness shots.

Lake Viedmar Glacier outside El Chalten, Patagonia, Argentina.

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The reflections of Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

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How about a stop for lunch at the Torres del Paine?

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The dawn view at the Poon Hill trek in Nepal, part of the Annapurna Circuit, about 3800m high.

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Streams of light…and rhododendrons. Rhododendrons were a recurring theme in my photos in Nepal. I couldn’t get enough of them, to the great mirth of my travel buddy, B!

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The beauty of the Australian countryside. The Megalong Valley near the Blue Mountains…a path to heaven. Whispy clouds and windswept trees.

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The salt flats of Uyuni, Bolivia are like a never ending sky. The 4WDs we were in looked like they were hovering in the milky sky.

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The desert landscape of San Pedro de Atacama, Chile was also a stark and glorious view. Burnt oranges, yellow skies. Silhouette valleys.

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Cityscape Central

Cities are amazing places. Especially the big ones. High rise buildings towering over us, targeting the heavens and inspirational examples of creative design. I love the mix of old and young in the architecture of American cities like Chicago, Philly and New York. They harbor the historic art deco buildings that heralded the era of the metropolis, and they now evidence 20th century utilitarian sensibilities with skyscrapers and glass reflections abound.

I recently visited Chicago in the summer…and what a beautiful, majestic city! It is obviously famous for its architecture, so that came as no surprise that it was so imposing and grand as a city, with creative geometrical patterns and shapes, tessellation designs. The classic boat tour along the river was a wonderful insight into the city’s proud architectural heritage. Even better though was the quiet meandering of the streets and discovering the old metallic bridges which speak of the industrial age, the art deco and belle epoch signs of theaters and concert halls. Surprising was the fact that there are even grand buildings with pieces of other famous buildings – like the Parthenon, Colosseum, Goethe’s house and more, as if the city’s heritage alone were not enough! The physical environment is just one aspect of what becomes an interesting intertwining of environment and human politics as well – the hubbub that came out of the TRUMP tower was incredible as proud Chicago folk angrily spoke out against the eyesore of the city’s skyline in headlines. The city’s beautiful outdoor concert spaces are also a pleasure to visit, but unbeknownst to the summer tourist the blizzards of Lake Michigan will ice over these warm bright spaces within only a few months!

You’ll see that I particularly love getting shots of buildings at strange or alternative angles, so the building becomes part of the photo’s geometry in itself, slicing the photos into parts. I hope you enjoy some of my shots – just one of viewing cities already filled with diverse perspectives. The black and white filter made me imagine what Chicago must have been like in the 1920s…

Wandering around these cities on travels is a recipe for tripping over or walking into a pole, but I wouldn’t have it any other way! It is a feast for the eyes when you loop upward…and that’s before you turn your head again to witness the bustling streets filled with a cornucopia of people!

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This is me

Daughter of a New York-born father and Italian-born mother that met in a chance encounter on a train from London to Paris on New Year’s Eve, brought up in Sydney, Australia, and now having found my way to New York City…I feel I was destined for a life of travels, creative whimsy and exploration! I am now 27 years old  and having searched out the intense novelty of new experiences and the feelings of awe that come from exposure to diverse cultures and vibrant landscapes, I have added all 7 worldly continents to my life’s storyboard.

I also love art.  Art and all things artistic. Trips to galleries, concerts and museums filled my childhood, my already abundant conversation and my travel itineraries as I searched for creative inspiration, collected way too many brochures and sought out friends with whom I could share my enthusiasm (including for the occasional ‘crafternoon’). Art, like travels and travel advice, I believe are meant to be shared.

The areas around NYU, Washington Square Park and Central Park in my new hometown, New York City, are part of what has inspired a love of shared entertainment and public artistic expression in me. Grand pianos on the sidewalk, saxophone concertos in the park, bookstores overflowing with quirky titles and self-reflective memoirs. How great does it feel to be surrounded by this positive energy? It is impossible not to feel the optimism that comes from participating in the street life of this city.

And so now, I too am deciding to follow my creative passions and to share them with you, because that’s what I love to do!

Art. Photography. Travel.

Inspire. Admire. Wonder.

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Artward. Outward. Upward.

M xx